Julio Ayala

Julio Ayala, Ph.D.[Lake Nona in Orlando]

Glp1 is of particular interest to me because it plays a role in regulating many different metabolic events. Not only does Glp1 stimulate insulin secretion, we believe that it also has direct effects on glucose and fat metabolism, feeding behavior, and cardiac function. Joining Sanford-Burnham allows me to take advantage of different technology cores as well as a collaborative atmosphere to investigate the various actions of Glp1 in the regulation of fuel metabolism.

  • Associate Director, Cardiometabolic Phenotyping Core
  • Research

    Dr. Ayala focuses on the role of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (Glp-1) and its receptor in the regulation of fuel metabolism.

  • Biography

    Dr. Ayala received his Ph.D. and conducted his post-doctoral studies in molecular physiology and biophysics at Vanderbilt University.

Publications

 

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Julio Ayala's Research Focus

Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, Aging-Related Diseases, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cardiomyopathies, Metabolic Diseases, Diabetes - General

Julio AyalaWatch Dr. Ayala describe his research

The growing epidemic of the metabolic syndrome is a critical health care issue affecting the quality of life for millions of individuals. A predominant factor associated with the metabolic syndrome is dysregulated fuel metabolism. The general aim of our research has been to understand the control of inter-organ fuel metabolism with particular emphasis on the regulation of glucose flux by insulin. The approach is to utilize dietary manipulations and pharmacological intervention to perturb metabolic systems in various mouse models. Our laboratory has developed state-of-the-art chronic catheterization techniques that allow for the assessment of insulin action in vivo in unstressed, non-restrained conscious mice using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp.

Julio Ayala's Research Report

Julio Ayala
Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut-secreted peptide that enhances the secretion of insulin from pancreatic beta cells in response to nutrient intake. Because of this incretin effect, GLP-1 action is an attractive target for anti-diabetic therapies. Evidence from our group indicates that signaling through the GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) also modulates insulin action in the liver and skeletal muscle independent of its ability to stimulate insulin secretion. Interestingly, the Glp1r is not expressed in either the liver or skeletal muscle. However, the Glp1r is expressed in hypothalamic nuclei that play a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. The Glp1r is also expressed in brain regions involved in the control of food intake and motivated behavior. Therefore, this presents an exciting opportunity for future research into the role of this incretin hormone to regulate various aspects of fuel metabolism.

About Julio Ayala

Experience

Julio Ayala, Ph.D., joined Sanford-Burnham from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Tennessee where he was Research Assistant Professor (2007-2009) in the Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and Technology Transfer Director for the Vanderbilt-NIH Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Center. Dr. Ayala received his Ph.D. and conducted his post-doctoral studies in molecular physiology and biophysics at Vanderbilt University. His postdoctoral work was at Vanderbilt with Dr. David Wasserman, focusing on regulatory mechanisms that control insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake.

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Education

B.S., Chemistry, Duke University, 1997
Ph.D., Molecular Physiology & Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2003 

Other Appointments

Adjoint Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular Physiology & Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine 

Funding Awards and Collaborative Grants

Junior Faculty Award, American Diabetes Association

Honors and Recognition

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Scholar in Diabetes, 2006
New Investigator Award, American Physiological Society, Endocrinology & Metabolism Section, 2008

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